According to official statistics, approximately 42 per cent of all marriages will end in divorce. But in recent weeks, a number of interesting pieces of research have shed light on some of the common factors which may be likely to lead to a relationship breakdown in the digital age.

Several studies have proven the growing popularity of online dating and mobile phone dating apps in recent years amongst those looking for love. But the latest research suggests that approximately one in three Britons are still active on such dating apps when they are in long-term relationships or marriages.

Inevitably, this can lead to serious problems in a relationship. In fact, the study, which quizzed more than 2,000 people about their relationships and online dating habits, found that almost three quarters (74 per cent) of Britons would consider a divorce if they caught their partner using a dating app.

Meanwhile, a separate study commissioned by Opiuim Research has found that joint bank accounts appear to be causing problems for British couples, too.

According to a survey, again of around 2,000 UK adults, 81 per cent of Britons value their financial independence – and more than a quarter believe that joint bank accounts can lead to arguments and even divorce.

This problem may be exacerbated in the age of online banking and payments, which effectively makes it easier than ever before for Britons to make impulse purchases and to check up on each other’s purchases by reviewing their online accounts.

34 per cent of respondents said that they would prefer to keep their finances separate, while 25 per cent said that they ‘felt guilty’ whenever they spent money held in a joint account.

The research found that an increasing number of Britons are actively choosing to keep their accounts separate in a bid to avoid “inevitable rows”.